Face.com

Face.com was the largest face recognition platform on the cloud.

Company GOAL:

Bring Face Recognition to the masses

Clarity’s Challenge:

Put the “Face” in Facebook

ABOUT

These days, we take face recognition for granted, as it does everything from unlocking your phone to helping police find missing persons. Not that long ago, however, mass adoption of face recognition was still locked in the realm of science fiction. Unlocking the potential of this nascent technology was the challenge faced (ahem) by Face.com when they launched back in 2008 with a small team based in Tel Aviv. Another challenge, this time for Clarity: like most great sci-fi technologies, teaching computers how to identify any human, anywhere seemed just as likely to spawn Skynet as the iPhone X.

The team needed a strategy that put a friendly face (ahem again) on a deeply technical product that had just as many potential pitfalls as benefits. Working with Face from the moment they launched to their acquisition by Facebook in 2012, the Bay Area Clarity team developed a strategy that highlighted both the consumer and developer-friendly sides of the company. Primarily, they provided API resources to software developers, large and small, including a variety of programming tools centered on face recognition and face detection. A significant part of our role with Face.com was building out their developer network, from small independent app developers to large multi-national partners such as Intel.

We helped Face.com grow their developer community from an initial node of several hundred people to a community of more than 45,000 active members, through a combination of media outreach, direct messaging, newsletters, events, Hackathons and speaking opportunities.  Face.com grew to be the premier provider of consumer face recognition and detection on the Web.

Whether it was launching direct to consumer products like Photo Finder (to find photos of yourself on Facebook), highlighting odd and attention-grabbing consumer applications from Face users, or putting on amazing parties featuring the vocal stylings of Randi Zuckerberg – Clarity also developed strategies designed to demystify this extremely mysterious tech.

Results

Worked with the company from launch through eventual acquisition by Facebook in 2012
Grew Face.com’s developer network from a few hundred to over 45,000
Secured appearances by the CEO on Good Morning America and ABC Nightline
Hundreds of original articles in every major outlet from Reuters, the New York Times, and CNN to Wired, MIT Tech Review, and TechCrunch

more of our work

Monzo

Company Goal: Make money work for everyone

Clarity’s Challenge: Convince the US that it deserves a better bank

When most people think of exciting, disruptive tech, the last place that comes to mind is the staid world of banking. Resistant to change since cavemen chiseled the first deposit slip, the banking industry’s reputation of glacial innovation is well earned. Of course, this was borne out of some necessity: in years past, one of the scariest words a bank customer could hear (besides “overdrawn”) was “disruption”. Banks were meant to be secure, stable, trusted, and unchanging.

Of course, that all changed during the global financial crisis. Consumer confidence in their banks crashed almost as hard as stock markets. At the same time, smartphones were slowly taking over the world and reinventing industries left and right. Over time, these factors led to the rise of the “Challenger Banks”: startups armed with the technology, ability, and desire to work directly with their customers to build the bank of the future.

The UK served as the global hotbed for these challenger banks and, in 2015, one in particular captured the hearts and minds of young brits: Monzo. Initially launched as a grassroots movement and crowdfunding campaign, in 4 short years Monzo grew to over 2 million customers in the UK, adding 200,000 each month (the fastest growing bank in the country – challenger or established) and a valuation well over £3 Billion. Even in the land of Unicorns, Monzo’s meteoric rise read like an unbelievable fairytale.

In 2019, firmly established as a household name in the UK, Monzo turned its attention to the United States. While the consumer profile looked similar to their rabid fanbase at home, this “New World” represented a return to square one for Monzo. Faced with the challenge of how to best introduce itself to American press and consumers, Monzo turned to Clarity San Francisco.

From there, Monzo’s senior leadership worked closely with Clarity to establish a press strategy and messaging fully tailored to the US market. Despite their reputation overseas, Clarity understood that stateside media would not simply roll out the red carpet for Monzo’s arrival on American shores. After all, the US banking industry has shown itself particularly adept to fending off challengers in the past, and press are not unaware of the battle ahead for Monzo.

To combat this skepticism, Clarity developed a strategy for Monzo that included in-person meetings for Monzo CEO Tom Blomfield with press across the spectrum from the Wall Street Journal, to TechCrunch, to Reuters. For each briefing, messaging was closely researched and tailored to speak to the benefits of Monzo while understanding the nuances of each publication and the difficult questions the team would likely face.

As a result, the briefings (and resulting coverage) could not have been more positive on the future prospects for Monzo in the US.

 

Here were (just some) of the results:

 

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This Girl Can

Company Goal: Launched in 2015, #TGC has successfully persuaded nearly three million women to get more active – but their work isn’t done yet. Clarity partnered with #TGC’s initiative, This Girl Can Swim to help them understand the messaging and imagery to use in their paid campaigns to best lead to women attending women’s only sessions at across 40 pools in the UK.

Clarity’s Challenge: Creating an effective paid strategy focused on converting a highly regionalized and specific demographic audience.

Clarity’s approach was to construct  test approach to determine the most successful strategy and one that would inform campaigns. We ran 1-week test phases across creative, brand messaging, and targeting and leveraged the learnings from each test phase to underpin optimisation throughout the wider project.

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Spatial

Company Goal: Clarity was tasked by Spatial one week before CES to elevate its presence at the show and garner attention from top tier outlets for its Q1 funding and partnership news.

Clarity’s Challenge: Clarity’s challenge was to deliver results in a short time frame

Spatial enables an entirely new way of working together and eliminates the need for video conferencing and work travel. With Spatial, users can connect from all over the world and share ideas seamlessly using lifelike avatars and knowledge work tools, unlocking a new level of productivity not confined by space.

Clarity was tasked by Spatial one week before CES to elevate its presence at the show and garner attention from top tier outlets for its Q1 funding and partnership news. With the obvious short time frame and news agenda around CES, Clarity’s challenge was to deliver meaningful results in one of the busiest times of the year.

Clarity worked hard to secure key briefings for Spatial, and in the week before CES and after the event this has resulted in a steady cadence of media placements, including top tier coverage with Axios, Fast Company, Tech Meme, TechCrunch, TIME Magazine and more.

In total, Clarity has secured over 40 placements to-date surrounding Spatial’s presence at CES, its Series A funding round, and partnership news and continues to generate placements amid its growth in popularity due to remote work.

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